Do you have any advice for "finding a style" or just feeling more comfortable with your art in general, you're like one of my biggest inspirations.

barachan:

thank you! if you can, just try to draw for yourself for a while, without any intent of showing anyone else or posting the results online, so you won’t feel pressured to come up with “perfect” art that other people won’t be able to judge. i’m not sure if this applies to you, but in the past it was something i personally struggled with a lot — trying to somehow preemptively make critique-proof art put me through a LOT of art blocks till i realized 1) there’s no such thing as perfect crit-proof art and 2) who cares what other people think, as long as they aren’t paying your bills?????? your life, your art!

draw as often as you can, and expect a lot of your drawings to suck. the more you make art a regular routine, the less intimidating it will be, and you’ll feel less pressured to make some kind of masterpiece every time…and trust me, even experienced professional artists make lots of crappy throwaway sketches. don’t rely on “being inspired” before you create anything, because inspiration actually doesn’t come that often for most people. if your initial attempts that day turn out awful, stick with it as long as you can instead of saying “i can’t draw today” and giving up — you’ll find that drawing well is actually a state of mind that you CAN get yourself into, as long as you don’t allow yourself to be discouraged by your first few attempts. warmup sketches are a thing for a reason

diversify your influences, look at totally different genres of art. sometimes if you focus too much on 1-2 influences, you want your art to look like theirs and get depressed that it doesn’t, but i think looking at more genres/styles has the opposite effect and makes you realize there are tons of possibilities with your own work and you can absolutely create a niche for yourself — very inspiring!

and, experiment a lot! use every program and tool and media you can, draw all kinds of different things, draw in different styles. figure out what you enjoy most, and then refine your techniques from there. don’t worry about what’s popular, just focus on trying to find something that clicks with you personally, because trying to struggle through a creation process you aren’t hype for will just make art unpleasant for you. but, if you can find a process you love, your enthusiasm for it will show in your work

best of luck!!

When minor characters who are also ethnic minorities start talking among themselves in their native tongues, they sometimes take advantage of their invisibility to say things. Sometimes they break the Fourth Wall and start ranting about the movie director. Sometimes, they spout random obscenities or natter about their lousy lunch. It’s all in not-English, so whatever they say doesn’t matter! And the actual translations of their lines can be a secret source of hilarity in films where actors are instructed to use a Gratuitous Foreign Language (GFL) in order to make a scene sound more authentic. When some Native Americans cast in Westerns were told to speak their own language to add some authenticity, these actors took the opportunity to crudely editorialize about their director, which allegedly resulted in Native American audiences (in)explicably cracking up laughing during scenes that were meant to be dramatic.

Minorities can be marginalized in film, but not silenced. (via salon)

This, too, is resistance

(via flybaldies)

dailyotter:

Otter Serenades His Friends with an Invisible Piano
Thanks, Adrian and Laura!
[ZSL London Zoo]

dailyotter:

Otter Serenades His Friends with an Invisible Piano

Thanks, Adrian and Laura!

[ZSL London Zoo]

barachan:

so moon crisis is over, and it was an amazing success! i’m so proud i was able to be a part of it; seeing so many different interpretations of sailor moon and knowing everyone else there grew up loving the series at the same time i did was an incredible experience. thank you very much to everyone who supported the show, both in person and online!!

here’s the full image post for my “tantibus” piece, which i started almost a year ago (!) and took 4 months to finish. LOTS of you have been asking for prints online, so i’ve finally set it up at both society6 and redbubble. i’ll have signed prints available at AWA later this month, and in my storenvy sometime in october

killbenedictcumberbatch:

why do white people think having a confederate flag anywhere on your property screams anything other than “im a blatant racist and slavery was cool”

america-wakiewakie:

Man Dies After Cops Use Tasers as Cattle Prods 13 Times, Forcing Him To Walk | The Free Thought Project
East Point Police Department in Georgia has a very clear policy against tasers being used to “escort or prod” suspects or being used on handcuffed suspects, and this case is a very clear example of why.
A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of the family, including the 7 month old son, of 24 year old Gregory Towns, who died after being tased 13 times in 29 minutes. Two officers repeatedly shocked this man’s body for a total of 47 seconds… while unarmed and handcuffed.
Police found Towns sitting down and out of breath after a short foot chase. He asked officers at least ten times to be allowed to rest before going with them, according to AJC.  The cops then decided to use their weapons as a cattle prod to force the weak man to walk, instead of just letting him catch his breath.
The autopsy ruled the death a homicide, as Towns died in a shallow creek where several of the shocks took place.
Officer Eberhart has been terminated while Weems resigned to avoid it.
Lawyers for the family say police are trying to cover up how many times they used their tasers. Only six taser shocks were logged on their police reports despite taser logs which indicate that Sgt. Marcus Eberhart fired his Taser 10 times, and officer Howard Weems fired three times.
The Police Benevolent Association, who recently gave a reprehensible press conference supporting officers involved in Eric Garner’s chokehold murder are, of course, representing one of the officers.
According to Amnesty International, between 2001 and 2008, 351 people in the United States died from being shocked by police tasers. Electronic Villiage has documented another 212 taser-related deaths in the United States from 2009-2014. That means there have been at least 563 documented taser-related deaths in America since 2001.  You can view the list here.
While we often ask “why didn’t that cop use a taser instead of his gun?”, it is important to remember that while a person is less likely to die from a taser shock than a gun shot, they are still a weapon, and still often unnecessary and lethal.

america-wakiewakie:

Man Dies After Cops Use Tasers as Cattle Prods 13 Times, Forcing Him To Walk | The Free Thought Project

East Point Police Department in Georgia has a very clear policy against tasers being used to “escort or prod” suspects or being used on handcuffed suspects, and this case is a very clear example of why.

A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of the family, including the 7 month old son, of 24 year old Gregory Towns, who died after being tased 13 times in 29 minutes. Two officers repeatedly shocked this man’s body for a total of 47 seconds… while unarmed and handcuffed.

Police found Towns sitting down and out of breath after a short foot chase. He asked officers at least ten times to be allowed to rest before going with them, according to AJC.  The cops then decided to use their weapons as a cattle prod to force the weak man to walk, instead of just letting him catch his breath.

The autopsy ruled the death a homicide, as Towns died in a shallow creek where several of the shocks took place.

Officer Eberhart has been terminated while Weems resigned to avoid it.

Lawyers for the family say police are trying to cover up how many times they used their tasers. Only six taser shocks were logged on their police reports despite taser logs which indicate that Sgt. Marcus Eberhart fired his Taser 10 times, and officer Howard Weems fired three times.

The Police Benevolent Association, who recently gave a reprehensible press conference supporting officers involved in Eric Garner’s chokehold murder are, of course, representing one of the officers.

According to Amnesty International, between 2001 and 2008, 351 people in the United States died from being shocked by police tasers. Electronic Villiage has documented another 212 taser-related deaths in the United States from 2009-2014. That means there have been at least 563 documented taser-related deaths in America since 2001.  You can view the list here.

While we often ask “why didn’t that cop use a taser instead of his gun?”, it is important to remember that while a person is less likely to die from a taser shock than a gun shot, they are still a weapon, and still often unnecessary and lethal.

iguanabones:

the afterlife isnt all its hyped up to be

howtobeterrell:

blacksupervillain:

D.W. Hunter, the great grandson of Anna Short Harrington, the woman who became “Aunt Jemima,” has filed a class action lawsuit against PepsiCo Inc., its subsidiary Quaker Oats Co. , Pinnacle Foods and its onetime suitor, Hillshire Brands Co., on behalf of all of her great grandchildren.

this is the only article I’ve seen that has mad details about why this lawsuit is being filed. 

Yas!!!!! Reparations at last!

fabulouslyfreespirited:

If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies.
In what’s being called the biggest celebrity hacking incident in internet history, more than 100 female celebrities have had their private nude images stolen and published online. The bulk of the images posted have been officially confirmed as belonging to Jennifer Lawrence, but a complete list of victims’ names - including Krysten Ritter, Kate Upton, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rihanna, Brie Larson and Kirsten Dunst - has been subsequently published. (Link does not contain pictures, only names.)
The images were first uploaded by an anonymous member of the underground internet sewer known as 4chan and have since been enthusiastically shared across platforms like Reddit and Twitter. A representative for Lawrence has confirmed the images are real, condemning the theft of them as a “flagrant violation of privacy” and adding that “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos.”
There are a few different issues that a criminal act like this brings up, but before I get into them it’s necessary to make one thing clear: If you deliberately seek out any of these images, you are directly participating in the violation not just of numerous women’s privacy but also of their bodies. These images - which I have not seen and which I will not look for - are intimate, private moments belonging only to the people who appear in them and who they have invited to see them. To have those moments stolen and broadcast to the world is an egregious act of psychic violence which constitutes a form of assault.
The people sharing these images are perpetuating an ongoing assault. The people gleefully looking at them are witnessing and enjoying an ongoing assault. When you have been asked by victims of a crime like this not to exacerbate the pain of that crime and you continue to do so anyway, you are consciously deciding that your enjoyment, your rights and perhaps even just your curiosity are more important than the safety and dignity of the people you’re exploiting.
That out of the way, let’s get a few other things straight.
1. This is not a ‘scandal’
It’s a crime, and we should be discussing it as such. Some media outlets are salaciously reporting it otherwise, as if the illegal violation of privacy involving intimate images is little more than subject for gossip. When associated with sex, the word ‘scandal’ has been typically interpreted as something that assigns responsibility to all parties involved, a consensual act unfortunately discovered and for which everyone owes an explanation or apology. Remember when private nude photos of Vanessa Hudgens (whose name also appears on the list of victims) were leaked online and Disney forced her to publicly apologise for her “lapse in judgment” and hoped she had “learned a valuable lesson”? Never mind that Hudgens was an adult and a victim of privacy violation - the ‘scandal’ was painted as something for which she owed her fans an apology. Which leads us to:
2. These women do not ‘only have themselves to blame’
While depressing, it’s sadly unsurprising to see some people arguing that Lawrence et al brought this on themselves. Part of living in a rape culture is the ongoing expectation that women are responsible for protecting themselves from abuse, and that means avoiding behaviour which might be later ‘exploited’ by the people who are conveniently never held to account for their actions. But women are entitled to consensually engage in their sexuality any way they see fit. If that involves taking nude self portraits for the enjoyment of themselves or consciously selected others, that’s their prerogative.
Victims of crime do not have an obligation to accept dual responsibility for that crime. Women who take nude photographs of themselves are not committing a criminal act, and they shouldn’t ‘expect’ to become victims to one, as actress Mary E. Winstead pointed out on Twitter. 
Sending a photograph of your breasts to one person isn’t consenting to having the whole world see those breasts, just as consenting to sex with one person isn’t the same as giving permission for everyone else to fu*k you. Victim blaming isn’t okay, even if it does give you a private thrill to humiliate the female victims of sexual exploitation.
3. It doesn’t matter that ‘damn, she looks good and should own it!’
Stealing and sharing the private photographs of women doesn’t become less of a crime just because you approve them for fapping activity. I’m sure many of the women on this list are confident of their sexual attractiveness. It doesn’t mean they don’t value their privacy or shouldn’t expect to enjoy the same rights to it as everyone else. It also doesn’t mean they want strangers sweating over their images. That line of thinking comes from the same school which instructs women to either ignore of welcome sexual harassment when it’s seemingly ‘positive’ in its sentiments.
None of these women are likely to give a shit that you think their bodies are ‘tight, damn’. Despite what society reinforces to us about the public ownership of women’s bodies, we are not entitled to co-opt and objectify them just because we think we can defend it as a compliment.
I will not be seeking out these images out and I urge everyone else to avoid doing the same. I hope that all the women who have been victimised here are being appropriately supported by the authorities and their network of friends. And I hope sincerely that more people take a stand against this kind of behaviour.
Because this incident aside, it strikes me as deeply ironic that we will vehemently protest a free Facebook messenger app because we’re outraged at reports that it can access our phone’s numbers, and yet turn around and excuse the serving up of women’s bodies for our own pleasure. Our appreciation is no less disgusting just because it’s accompanied by the sound of one hand clapping.